The world doesn’t change one person at a time. It changes as networks of relationships form among people who discover they share a common cause and vision of what’s possible… Rather than worry about critical mass, our work is to foster critical connections. We don’t need to convince large numbers of people to change; instead, we need to connect with kindred spirits. Through these relationships, we will develop the new knowledge, practices, courage, and commitment that lead to broad-based change. – Margaret Wheatley

What we do to the environment, we do unto ourselves. Our environment’s health is our health.

Everything exists in systems of relationships, or ecologies. We exist in interdependent relationships with our environment through the food we eat, water we drink, air we breathe, and communities we are a part of. Our behaviors, including land, agricultural, and water management practices, affect our environment and, consequently, our health.

Daily Acts has always prioritized the health of our environment by promoting land and water stewardship and homegrown skills. As part of our Be The Change model, in addition to spreading solutions and models, we are building networks and coalitions to strengthen community leadership and build the public will and civic engagement needed to shift culture and influence policy change specific to our environmental health.

There is no one-size-fits-all solution or pathway to restoring and enhancing our environmental health. There are many solutions and pathways. Much of what we need to resolve our most challenging environmental health issues can be found right here in our community. To this effect, we are proud to be the home of the North Bay Area Environmental Health Network and to help weave together coalitions and networks to address our environmental health issues.

What is Environmental Health?

Environmental health is the science and practice of preventing human illness and injury and promoting wellness for all. Environmental health is an intersectional issue that layers environmental justice and social justice issues. Community members who live, learn, and work on the frontlines of agriculture and industry are disproportionately impacted by unhealthy environmental practices.

Risk Factors:

Mono-culture is the practice of farming one single crop, like grapes. This crop specialization increases yield but also the risk of exposure to pests and diseases. Mono-culture is reliant on conventional agricultural practices which destroys soil nutrients, results in the use of harmful pesticides, pollutes groundwater supplies, requires a lot of water for irrigation, and alters the natural ecosystem.

Protective Factors:

Click on the links below to learn more about the organizations and concepts that help keep agriculture safe:

Risk Factors

Indoor and outdoor air quality have far-reaching health impacts. CO2 emissions, particulate pollution from smoke and ash, and pesticide drift impact human health.

Protective Factors

Click on the links below to learn more about the organizations that help protect air quality:

Risk Factors

Climate change presents many risks to our environmental health. The changing environment and climate catastrophes (like fires, storms, floods, extreme weather) is expected to cause more heat stress, an increase in waterborne and vector borne diseases, poor air quality, water shortages, food supply disruption, and mental health impacts.

Protective Factors

Click on the links below to learn more about the organizations that help mitigate climate change locally:

Risk Factors

Vector Borne illnesses are the result of an infection transmitted to humans and other animals by blood-feeding arthropods, such as mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas. Examples of vector-borne illness include Dengue Fever, West Nile Virus, Lyme Disease, and Malaria. (Marin/Sonoma Mosquito and Vector Control District)

Protective Factors

Risk Factors

Thousands of published, peer-reviewed studies by independent scientists have demonstrated harm from exposure to EMF and wireless radiation. Serious human health problems include reproductive harm, neurological problems and cancer. Children and other vulnerable populations are particularly at risk.

Protective Factors

Environmental education increases public awareness and knowledge of environmental issues. It teaches people to critically think about the environment and develop the skills to identify and resolve environmental risks.

Protective Factors

Click on the links below to learn more about local organizations that are providing environmental education: